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PYCL: Encourage pupils to take 2 tablets a day (the 10 Commandments)!

Kerry Jenkins, C.S., House Springs, MO

[PYCL: Encourage pupils to take 2 tablets a day (10 C.) as God's mental medication!]
Possible Younger Class Lessons for the Christian Science Bible Lesson for

“Unreality”

on October 2, 2016

by Kerry Jenkins, CS, House Springs, MO
kerry.helen.jenkins@gmail.com (314) 406-0041

Pycl #1: I think that I'd start with a quick review of the Ten Commandments. Ask the children if they know where to find them, while you are at it. Do they know who gave them to us (besides God)? Do they know that all the Jewish people were (and still are) educated in these Commandments, Jesus and other prophets along the way would have known them well? Jesus kind of put them in a positive light when he stated them as "Thou shalt love the lord thy God..." and "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself"—rather than "thou shalt not...". These two Commandments could be seen as a reduction of the Ten which are roughly divided into how we should worship and obey/love God, and how we should love our neighbor. I think it would be most helpful to have these Commandments written out in front of everyone on the table before diving into this lesson. Once you have reviewed, consider together how they would use the Commandments to illustrate something about this week's lesson, if they were to put such a lesson together.

Pycl #2: What does it mean that God doesn't see as we see? (Golden Text) Do they know the story of Moses and the veil that he had to wear? Why did he wear it and why was his face shining? Why are they talking about the veil here in the Responsive Reading (R.R.)? If you think of the veil and looking through material sense, rather than trusting and understanding God and seeing through spiritual sense (the understanding of God), then you will have it about right. Have them try on a veil and walk around in it. You could buy some slightly see-through fabric, just a yard or so, at a fabric store or Wal-Mart. What is it like to look through something that isn't perfectly clear? Try reading and thinking together about the last verse in the R.R.
The "open face" could be, without a veil. With younger children you may want to digress with this discussion and talk about how Jacob, in the Bible, was very materialistic. He stole two important things from his brother, a blessing and a birthright. Then he worked for his uncle so that he could marry Rachel. But his uncle tricked him by putting a heavy veil over Leah, Rachel's sister, so that Jacob would marry her instead (thinking that he was marrying Rachel). This is how material sense tricks us. If we are looking for happiness in matter, we can easily be fooled! You can get as deep into that story as the children are interested. Also, some of the ideas about the veil in the temple that are included in this week's CedarS Met are pretty interesting to consider when discussing this topic. Show them something that is four inches thick, how would it tear?! Show them something that is 60 feet tall! (Check outside for a tree that might be that tall, or explain that it would be "like two of those trees on top of each other!")

Pycl #3: The veil is a good way to discuss how we look through material sense to try to tell what is real, what is not. If we are living the Commandments, we hear God's voice, our material senses fade into the background, and our spiritual senses become sharp! How are we "epistles of Christ"? How do we live each Commandment? This could be an ongoing assignment for a number of weeks. How are we "able ministers of the New Testament"? What does it mean to the kids to "live" the word? Do living things change, grow? Or do they stay the same?

Pycl #4: A veil might be thought of as a disguise, it is mentioned that way in citation S4, also as a mask in citation S19. Is a mask or disguise the same thing as the person under them? You could have them practice with simple masks; you can bring them or have them use paper plate masks. It is getting towards Halloween time here in the U.S. so maybe this is even more appropriate? How is making a "god" out of something that is not God, like wearing a mask or disguise? Or how does it make us see other people incorrectly? Can we really tell who someone is when they are wearing a good costume?

Pycl #5: I like thinking about the Commandments to keep the Sabbath holy and not take the name of God in vain the way they portray them in this lesson. The idea of taking God's name needs to go way beyond the idea of simply saying "Oh, God" in an inappropriate way. I love the thought I get here, that it is thinking of God's nature (another word for name), as being anything but good. Principle is a name for God and means source. Therefore, as a source or creator, we can only attribute good things to His creation. Anything else would be unreal. And keeping the Sabbath day holy when we take off the simply material way to see that might be more along the lines of understanding God's constant demonstration of divine Love for man, healing. See if the kids have any other thoughts about these Commandments and how we might make them "live" in our experience today.
[Here’s an applicable idea just added to CedarS online Met about the 3rd and 4th Commandments: “Moses” (played by Warren) often awakens visitors to CedarS Bible Lands Park to give their loving attention to (and so to remember) their original, "very good", Sabbath-day perfection from Genesis 1 as they always work out from that perfection (rather than up to it). This gives them a precious freedom from frustration and from efforts made in vain. (3rd C. and 4th C.)]

Pycl #6: Check out some of the ideas in CedarS Met about obeying and honoring parents. Look at the "promise" that is given when we do this. Why are we promised this for obeying/respecting our parents? How do we understand our parents better by thinking about God as our true Father and Mother? Where do our human parents fit in this equation?

Pycl #7: Obviously I can't include everything in this lesson, but I love to think about the story in Section 4. It really is such a great one to retell and share and on which to found a good discussion of the two Commandments about killing and adultery. You can also talk about how those Commandments fit into our own experience since looking at the literal or "letter" of those, might be a bit irrelevant to a child's life!

Pycl #8: Finally, show how the story of the Good Samaritan illustrates all three of the final Commandments as it shows us how to live Love. All of those Commandments involve ways that we would hurt others to forward ourselves. Jesus' Golden Rule tells us what we should do if we want to really love and be loved. And Paul tells us in citation B19 to "Owe no man..."

Enjoy this Sunday!

[PYCL: Help students REAL-IZE REALITY by using their REAL EYES! (2)]
Possible Younger Class Lessons for the Christian Science Bible Lesson for

“Unreality”

on October 2, 2016

by Kerry Jenkins, CS, House Springs, MO
kerry.helen.jenkins@gmail.com (314) 406-0041

Pycl #1: I think that I'd start with a quick review of the Ten Commandments. Ask the children if they know where to find them, while you are at it. Do they know who gave them to us (besides God)? Do they know that all the Jewish people were (and still are) educated in these Commandments, Jesus and other prophets along the way would have known them well? Jesus kind of put them in a positive light when he stated them as "Thou shalt love the lord thy God..." and "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself"—rather than "thou shalt not...". These two Commandments could be seen as a reduction of the Ten which are roughly divided into how we should worship and obey/love God, and how we should love our neighbor. I think it would be most helpful to have these Commandments written out in front of everyone on the table before diving into this lesson. Once you have reviewed, consider together how they would use the Commandments to illustrate something about this week's lesson, if they were to put such a lesson together.

Pycl #2: What does it mean that God doesn't see as we see? (Golden Text) Do they know the story of Moses and the veil that he had to wear? Why did he wear it and why was his face shining? Why are they talking about the veil here in the Responsive Reading (R.R.)? If you think of the veil and looking through material sense, rather than trusting and understanding God and seeing through spiritual sense (the understanding of God), then you will have it about right. Have them try on a veil and walk around in it. You could buy some slightly see-through fabric, just a yard or so, at a fabric store or Wal-Mart. What is it like to look through something that isn't perfectly clear? Try reading and thinking together about the last verse in the R.R.
The "open face" could be, without a veil. With younger children you may want to digress with this discussion and talk about how Jacob, in the Bible, was very materialistic. He stole two important things from his brother, a blessing and a birthright. Then he worked for his uncle so that he could marry Rachel. But his uncle tricked him by putting a heavy veil over Leah, Rachel's sister, so that Jacob would marry her instead (thinking that he was marrying Rachel). This is how material sense tricks us. If we are looking for happiness in matter, we can easily be fooled! You can get as deep into that story as the children are interested. Also, some of the ideas about the veil in the temple that are included in this week's CedarS Met are pretty interesting to consider when discussing this topic. Show them something that is four inches thick, how would it tear?! Show them something that is 60 feet tall! (Check outside for a tree that might be that tall, or explain that it would be "like two of those trees on top of each other!")

Pycl #3: The veil is a good way to discuss how we look through material sense to try to tell what is real, what is not. If we are living the Commandments, we hear God's voice, our material senses fade into the background, and our spiritual senses become sharp! How are we "epistles of Christ"? How do we live each Commandment? This could be an ongoing assignment for a number of weeks. How are we "able ministers of the New Testament"? What does it mean to the kids to "live" the word? Do living things change, grow? Or do they stay the same?

Pycl #4: A veil might be thought of as a disguise, it is mentioned that way in citation S4, also as a mask in citation S19. Is a mask or disguise the same thing as the person under them? You could have them practice with simple masks; you can bring them or have them use paper plate masks. It is getting towards Halloween time here in the U.S. so maybe this is even more appropriate? How is making a "god" out of something that is not God, like wearing a mask or disguise? Or how does it make us see other people incorrectly? Can we really tell who someone is when they are wearing a good costume?

Pycl #5: I like thinking about the Commandments to keep the Sabbath holy and not take the name of God in vain the way they portray them in this lesson. The idea of taking God's name needs to go way beyond the idea of simply saying "Oh, God" in an inappropriate way. I love the thought I get here, that it is thinking of God's nature (another word for name), as being anything but good. Principle is a name for God and means source. Therefore, as a source or creator, we can only attribute good things to His creation. Anything else would be unreal. And keeping the Sabbath day holy when we take off the simply material way to see that might be more along the lines of understanding God's constant demonstration of divine Love for man, healing. See if the kids have any other thoughts about these Commandments and how we might make them "live" in our experience today.
[Here’s an applicable note just added to CedarS online Met about the 3rd and 4th Commandments: “Moses” (played by Warren) often awakens visitors to CedarS Bible Lands Park to give their loving attention to (and so to remember) their original, "very good", Sabbath-day perfection from Genesis 1 as they always work out from that perfection (rather than up to it). This gives them a precious freedom from frustration and from efforts made in vain. (3rd C. and 4th C.)]

Pycl #6: Check out some of the ideas in CedarS Met about obeying and honoring parents. Look at the "promise" that is given when we do this. Why are we promised this for obeying/respecting our parents? How do we understand our parents better by thinking about God as our true Father and Mother? Where do our human parents fit in this equation?

Pycl #7: Obviously I can't include everything in this lesson, but I love to think about the story in Section 4. It really is such a great one to retell and share and on which to found a good discussion of the two Commandments about killing and adultery. You can also talk about how those Commandments fit into our own experience since looking at the literal or "letter" of those, might be a bit irrelevant to a child's life!

Pycl #8: Finally, show how the story of the Good Samaritan illustrates all three of the final Commandments as it shows us how to live Love. All of those Commandments involve ways that we would hurt others to forward ourselves. Jesus' Golden Rule tells us what we should do if we want to really love and be loved. And Paul tells us in citation B19 to "Owe no man..."

Enjoy this Sunday!

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