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Enjoy CC & other Insights on select citations on “Adam and Fallen Man” (the Christian Science Bible Lesson for November 5, 2017)

Warren Huff (with insights from Cobbey Crisler)
Posted Sunday, October 29th, 2017

To go with this week's CedarS "Met" Application Ideas, I put together a few insights
from Cobbey Crisler and others on select citations from
the Christian Science Bible Lesson on
“Adam and Fallen Man" for November 5, 2017.
Hope you enjoy them! Warren Huff

,
Warren's (W's) addition PS#1 applied to citations B1, B2, B5, B7):

GENESIS I OR GENESIS 2
By Woodruff Smith

Where did it begin This idea called you? In Genesis I,

Or Genesis 2?

Which one of these concepts Will prove to be true?

If you know what is what, Do you know who is who?

In Genesis I in the 26th verse

There's a man with never a taint' of a curse.

But in Genesis 2 in verse number seven There's a dust man conceived...

He'll never see heaven. So it really comes down

To which one you will claim, What thou see'st thou be'st... So what is your name?

There they both stand. Which one is you?

Is it immortal man one, Or mortal man two?

If you're immortal man

You know what you're worth. For according to law

You'll inherit the earth. But if you're just a mortal And made out of dust...

Is there anything to you That's worthy of trust?

No, the thing they call man In Genesis 2

Is the dream of the dreamer. It never was you.

So know what you are. Take your place in the sun,

You're the immortal man Of Genesis I.

TESTIMONY OF HEALING follows

I gave a testimony one night in our Golden, Colorado church based on the ideas from a poem I really liked, which said, "Which of these men do you think of as you, Genesis One or Genesis Two?"

A couple of weeks later a businessman, not knowing I was behind him, probably, testified that he had heard a rather banal, trite testimony a couple of weeks ago from someone who recited that line, "Which of these men do you think of as you, Genesis One or Genesis Two?" and he thought it was so trivial, so lightweight.

He went to a business meeting in Atlanta, Georgia after that and was in a hotel room in the middle of the night, sound asleep with his wife beside him, when he had a massive heart attack.

He said he wasn't naive, he knew what was happening, and he knew he was in a life threatening situation. He was totally helpless, so helpless he could not even cry out to his wife for help, obviously could not call a practitioner, and he said for the first time in his life he felt completely helpless. He tried to repeat the Lord's Prayer, the 23rd Psalm, the Scientific Statement of Being, but he couldn't remember them, couldn't put them together.

He felt totally mentally jumbled and then he recalled a very simplistic statement..."Which of these men do you think of as you, Genesis One or Genesis Two?" and he realized that it wasn't so banal after all, that if he were a Genesis Two man he would probably not live through the night, but if he were a Genesis One man he could claim his dominion over the "things of the flesh."

He did it. He said the pain lifted immediately and he felt whole and well. He decided the poem was OK after all.

--Lona Ingwerson, CS

PS#2Cobbey Crisler’s notes on Psalms 17:15 (B12) and finding satisfaction and health only in the original!
“Verse 15 of Psalms 17 [tells us] that God’s prescriptions, precisely filled, bring satisfaction. Satisfaction because “we awake in God’s likeness.” But that results first from the prerequisite of “beholding God’s face in righteousness.” That requires us to go back to the theology of Genesis 1 [B1] to comprehend what that means. If we indeed are image, or likeness, and God is the original, the only way we can find out about our nature is to spend our time studying the original. Then we know the image. We also know what’s not the image by studying the original.

Just as Treasury Department experts know counterfeit bills, not because they have studied all the many thousands of counterfeit attempts, from poor work to expert work, but rather, simply study the original and you will know the counterfeit immediately. That’s in a sense akin to surgically removing in a mental way, or taking the purgative cathartic Word of God to remove what does not belong to our nature. Imagine the joy of letting go what has burdened us for so long. It’s part of that darkness that is ignorance, that the light, the laser beam of revealed truth, simply removes, and not painfully at all. It just does what light is supposed to do. It removes any rationale for the existence of darkness.”
“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms” by B. Cobbey Crisler

W’s PS#3—Cobbey Crisler’s notes on John 9:1-7 (B13) & Jesus healing man born blind
“John 9:2. “who did sin? (A) This fellow over here? Or (B) his parents?”
John 9:3. Jesus had that paper before him as in the examination room on that point many times before. “He says, (C), none of the above… [Or as Warren proposes (D) DNA (Deoxyribo Nucleic Acid (DNA) the molecule that supposedly carries encoded genetic instructions Does Not Apply!)] Neither hath this man sinned or his parents.” What’s that saying about origin? Where is that man? His roots are not in parents or in some reincarnated experience…”
Notice what he does in John 9:6 and what it may remind you of. “He spat on the ground, made clay of the spittle.” That reminds you of man being made of the dust in the Second Chapter of Genesis Verse 6 and 7, doesn’t it? Would Jesus ever [by spitting show contempt for or] mock God if he considered that was the real way that creation occurred? Yet, it almost looks like a mockery of that. He’s taking on that concept of the man of dust. He’s spitting on that ground, into the dust, making clay of it, and slapping it on the eyes of the blind man.
John 9:7. The man goes to the pool of Siloam. He can’t see his way there. He’s got mud all over his face. He doesn’t go seeing. He comes seeing.” He comes only after he has washed off that symbolic making or formation of man out of the dust.
In a way, it might even give us a greater hint on what the true meaning of baptism is, the immersion in Spirit, nativity, and washing off every trace of the dust man.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple” by B. Cobbey Crisler

PS#4—Cobbey Crisler’s insights on John 11:1-44 (B15) & Jesus raising Lazarus with gratitude-in-advance prayer.

In Chapter 11, note how Jesus handles news of a severe sickness.

In John 11:3, "Jesus gets a message from Lazarus' sisters that Lazarus is sick."

In John 11:4, the first thing Jesus says is, "This sickness is not unto death.”

Remember that's what he said about the man born blind in John 9:3, " Neither has this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the works of God might be manifest in him." We find the same kind of approach to a patient with Jesus' method of healing including that concept.

John 11:5, "He loved the family very much, the family of Bethany,”

John 11:6, "But he still remains for two days."

Then in John 11:7, he says, "Let us go into Judea again.”

John 11:8, "His disciples say, What? Last time we were there we had to duck projectiles. "

Then in John 11:11, he says to the disciples, “Our friend . . . (see the shepherd­motive) Lazarus sleepeth; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep." There are two Greek words for sleeping here. The first one is as if taking rest in sleep. The second one, "awake him out of sleep," is the Greek word "exhyp,nos”. It includes within it the root of our word hypnotism. It has a suggestion of a trance-like, not­normally-induced sleep. It is interesting to see Jesus referring to death as a process of needing to be awakened from a trance.

John 11:12. His disciples misunderstand that whole thing and "they say, If he’s sleeping, leave him alone. He’s fine if he’s resting."

John 11:13 shows how Jesus was using what we would call a euphemism. He avoided the word die, because he is seeing it differently.

In John 11:14, when, "they don't comprehend him, he says very plainly, Lazarus is dead ."

John 11:16. Thomas doesn’t cover himself with glory every time he appears in the Scriptures. On the other hand, neither do we in our daily lives very often. I don't think we should finger-point at Thomas. But Thomas does have somewhat of a note of sarcasm here when he says to his fellow disciples, "Alright, let's go with him. Let's go die with him if he's going to Judea. " This was something he was not that willing to do when the opportunity arose. As you recall, when they captured Jesus in Gethsemane, where did Thomas head with all the rest of them?

John 11:17, "When Jesus arrives, we find that four days Lazarus had been in the tomb." He sees the scene that was so often associated with death, the hired mourners and the official mourners.

Martha appears in what I hope will always be a new light. We have a tendency to stereotype, even people we haven't known. Martha has been labeled for centuries, "Don't be a Martha." Some people are sorry their name is Martha, because of that.

In John 11:25, it is only to Martha that Jesus ever makes the statement, "I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live." Since we know that Jesus only addressed the receptive thought, and since Martha is the only one to whom he felt free to say, "I am the resurrection," it is somewhat of an honor to be named Martha from that point of view. ...

John 11:33, "shows the weeping and the groaning that's going on."

John 11:35 is the shortest verse in the Bible. It indicates Jesus' humanity, "Jesus wept."

John 11:36, "Behold how he loved him!"

John 11:37, "They asked, Could this man have prevented this incident?"

John 11:38, "Jesus comes to the cave."

John 11:39, "And says, Take ye away the stone. At that point even Martha's faith breaks down. It's a hot country and a body in a tomb for four days and she so states."

John 11:40, "Jesus," supporting her continuing faith, "said, Didn't I tell you that if you would believe, you would see the glory of God?" Thereby he continued to support the resurrection trust in womanhood.

John 11:41, "They took away the stone. Jesus lifts up his eyes, and makes a pronouncement that what he desires through prayer has already been accomplished. I thank thee that thou hast heard me."

John 11:42, "And I knew that thou hearest me always. That's a remarkable statement of Jesus' theology.

Here's what the Anchor Bible says: "The prayer of petition is not the only form of prayer. If prayer is a form of union with God, then the Johannine (John's Gospel) Jesus is always praying, for he and the Father are one."

1 John 5:14 is another work attributed to the beloved disciple and one of the most beautiful views and definitions of prayer. It comes through the transparency of this thought that was so close to Jesus. Check your prayer against this measurement.

Here is the "Bureau of Standards" on prayer, "This is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us." Notice the qualification. It is not according to our will. It is totally selfless.

1 John 5:15. But that's not all, "If we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we desired of him.” That's prayer of affirmation coming through there.

In John 11:42, isn't that exactly what Jesus said, "I know that thou hearest me always. If we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions. “It is important to examine how our prayers measure against that standard. We also find Jesus expressing gratitude before the event.

John 11:43. Then he says, “Lazarus, come forth." Obviously, he wouldn’t yell if he didn't think Lazarus could hear. You notice he's communicating with a so­called dead man, expecting him to be able to hear, using one of the faculties that was supposedly shut off. At the point of death, he doesn't regard it as shut off.

John 11:44, "Lazarus comes forth,” very awkwardly, I may add, but nothing could keep him from answering that demand. As a matter of fact, if you have been through the traditional tomb of Lazarus in Bethany, I consider it much more of a miracle that he ever emerged from the tomb, let alone being raised from the dead. I’m quite sure he would have bumped his head several times on his way out.

There's another part of the healing that’s necessary. "Jesus turns to those around him, “the environment, holding him in this grave, "and says, ‘Loose him, and let him go.'" There is a sense of freedom which is so important. Remember what he says to a woman in another gospel, Luke 13:12, "Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple” by B. Cobbey Crisler

**You can buy your own transcripts and audio recordings of most of Cobbey’s 28 talks at a new website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Please email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com]

PS#5—Enjoy a clever modern day retelling of the story of Christ Jesus raising of Lazarus as a live new cast by bag puppets. Although recommended for ages 5-14 this video speaks clearly and freshly to all ages receptive to Jesus' incredible spiritual insight and how we can all follow him today. Just click on
https://www.christianscience.com/youth/sunday-school/resources/raising-lazarus

[LETTING CEDARS TOP NEEDS OF THE WEEK BE KNOWN:

  • [Your GIFTS are VERY MUCH NEEDED and ESPECIALLY APPRECIATED to help us cover a wonderful year FULL of BIGGER than anticipated maintenance and operating expenses and HUGE with camper and staff blessings. Your generous support will enable CedarS to be sustainable in its efforts to bless over 1200 Sunday School students for this summer and in future years. The blessings of making one's own the love and science of Christianity are not only immediate and heartfelt, but they also last forever--as can be seen in our summer FRUITAGE. Please check back on this webpage in coming weeks for a gushing stream of new stories of blessings felt across the country and around the world--thanks to God and to your ongoing generosity! CedarS, your friend in need is "a friend indeed!"

    1. "Unrestricted Gifts" allow CedarS to allocate funds where most needed.

    2. "Maintenance Musts" Matching Funds! This hugely helpful matching grant offer has been renewed by dear supporters to match up to $25,000 through year-end 2017!

    3. “Adopt the Herd” Matching Opportunity! Generous donors, aware of the ongoing need to care for CedarS herd, will match donations for our horse program! (Thanks for helping us reach our $56k goal to answer our prayer for a full program and care for our four-legged friends.)

    Especially helpful are your much-needed MONTHLY gifts, past and ongoing, that can be started and adjusted as you wish at: www.cedarscamps.org/giving ]

    [You can also reach a member of the Founding family nearly anytime by
    PHONE at 417-532-6699

    or MAIL your tax-deductible support to our 501-C-3 organization
    (Our not-for-profit, Federal Identification Number is #440-66-3883):

    The CedarS Camps, Inc.
    19772 Sugar Drive
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    [THANKS TO YOU PRECIOUS DONORS FOR YOUR ONGOING, GENEROUS and NEEDED SUPPORT OF CedarS IMPORTANT WORK!]

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