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Here are Cobbey Crisler and other insights on some citations for God, the Christian Science Bible Lesson for July 15, 2018

Warren Huff (with insights from Cobbey Crisler)
Posted Sunday, July 8th, 2018

Here are Cobbey Crisler and other insights on some citations for
“God”
The Christian Science Bible Lesson for July 15, 2018

Warren’s PS#1 –Cobbey Crisler’s on “Be still and know...” in Psalms 46:10 (B3)
“Psalm 46, Verse 10. One of the simplest prescriptions for the human mind to take and one of the most difficult. The human mind resists to the hilt taking this one. “Be still and know that I [am] God.” The racket of thought quieted. It’s a very strong word, “Be still.” Jesus used those words to calm violence in nature [Mark 4:39], and also to cast out an unclean spirit [Mark 1:25]. It doesn’t belong in nature or human nature. Certainly it’s not part of the divine nature. So, “Be still” is [a] very emphatic verbal rebuke.”
“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


PS#2—Cobbey Crisler on seeing & singing your new ID, healing, Psalm 30:2-5 (B4)
“Psalm 30:2 Again, the appointment with the physician, the Great Physician, in the Bible is very often this, “O Lord my God, I cried unto thee.” It does not take our being attuned to God to make the appointment. Just as the prodigal son suddenly decided that his really right place was not in that pig pen when he came to himself [Luke 15: 16-18]. There’s a whole new view of one’s identity. He decided that his father’s house held much more. Then you notice the father did not go to the man with the swine to save the son. The son had to do something. Then the father ran to meet him as he was coming [Luke 15:20]. With your back to the Father, you’re not even heading in that direction. With your face toward the Father you’re looking at the Father’s face, which is part of the cure biblically, [that] is to see the divine nature. Then of course, you want to be nearer the source of your nature. Step by step the light grows brighter around your feet. We know where we’re heading. We may not have arrived yet, but it’s getting brighter, and lighter, and our problems are dropping away, our burdens, and the divine nature is becoming applicable nearer and nearer. “O Lord my God, I cried unto thee; you have healed me.”


“One of our modern hymns [#425] has been made out of verse 5, “weeping may endure for a night, but joy [cometh] in the morning.” That word “joy” in the Hebrew is “singing.” Take weeping as the symptom and notice singing is the remedy. Sing, do we do much singing? It doesn’t have to be even with an audible or perceptible sound. It’s in our hearts, the song…. All the things that Jesus mentioned. They have to make room for the joy. It’s fullness of joy. It’s God’s dosage. Everything else has to be eliminated, removed, uncontained. That’s quite a prescription for depression, adversity. It seems difficult to sing in a trial, in a crisis. The Bible is just saying, try it, you might like it. [Laughter] Because it might solve [any and all issues.
Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#3—Cobbey Crisler on Psalms 19:7, 8 (B6):
“Read Psalms chapter 19:7-9 and you will discover there are quality controls as far as God’s medicine is concerned: all the things you would want to see on the label. Look at the words “perfect,” “sure,” right,” “pure,” “clean,” and “true,” which has the meaning in Hebrew of stable. You want a stable product. You want a clean product. You want it pure. You want it right. You don’t want the wrong remedy. You want it sure. You want it perfect.”
“Leaves of the Tree”: A Prescription from Psalms. by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#4—Mary Baker Eddy on Paul’s words in Athens (B9, Acts 17:28, and S10, part of "the scientific statement of being"):
**“St. Paul said to the Athenians, “For in Him we live and move and have our being.” This statement is in substance identical with my own: “There is no life, truth, substance, nor intelligence in matter.” It is quite clear that this great verity has not yet been fully demonstrated, but it is nevertheless true. If Christian Science reiterates Paul’s teaching, we, as Christian Scientists, should give to the world convincing proof of the validity of this scientific statement of being. Having perceived, in advance of others, this scientific fact, we owe to ourselves and to the world a struggle for its demonstration.” Retrospection and Introspection, 93: 17]

Also, Cobbey Crisler shared these insights on the context of Paul’s words to the Athenians in Acts 17 (B9): “Well, now Paul is heading for the cultural capital of civilization, Athens. And you can’t even go to modern day Athens without appreciating somewhat of what Paul saw, looking around at the remnants of that great city and “the columned buildings that were dedicated to so many gods. It must have moved Paul.” …

“And so he opens his mouth and begins right away to talk in Athens. Now this is a tough area in which to introduce Christianity, except at least they were willing to listen because everybody talked about anything. I mean there were a lot of weirdo sects and ideas that they welcomed without question in Athens because everybody liked to dispute these ideas anyway.

“He’s in the market, the agora, as well as in the synagogue. He runs into Epicureans; he runs into Stoics.” Now Tarsus where Paul came from happens to be a Stoic stronghold. So he must have been certainly aware of that philosophy…

“They bring him to Areopagus, the hill of Mars or Aries, and they asked him to explain what he has to say.” …

Acts 17:22  Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars’ hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

Paul, standing there, shows how a lecture can be tailor-made to any environment. And, it’s better than uniformity if you want to get the ear of the locals. And in this way, you will find at no point does Paul mention the Old Testament. Why? (Pause) What would that mean to the Athenians? (See below, Acts 17:23, paraphrased)

Instead, he kind of says, “On my way to the forum…you know. In other words, here I was, and I saw something you had back here. And, it says TO THE UNKNOWN GOD.” (See Acts 17:23 …

“Would everybody be listening? It relates. He’s picked up something locally. And, would you also be listening if he said “That monument you put ‘TO THE UNKNOWN GOD’, I want to tell you a little something about him. He’s unknown to you, but here’s some information that might be helpful… “And then, in Acts 17, verse 24, he describes “that God who made all, and therefore, couldn’t dwell in temples made with hands.” …

We’re reminded of whom? Yes, but since Jesus, we heard that from Stephen, remember? As Saul, himself, he had heard that.

“He dwelleth not in temples made with hands.” (paraphrase)

What do you think that comment does when you’re looking at the Parthenon and buildings like it? “God doesn’t dwell in all of this. He made everything. How can you contain Him?” … Very interesting point.

Have we even arrived at that point today in our thinking? … I doubt the Athenians had either.

“The search where God is...” will end up with the conclusion in the last line of Acts 17, verse 27, “that He’s not very far from every one of us.” And then Paul very cleverly introduces lines from local poets: “In him we live, and move, and have our being” and “for we are also his offspring” – parts of poems we have identified, and they even know the authors. (See below, partial)

Acts 17:28 For in him we live, and move, and have our being**; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.
“After the Master, What? The Book of Acts”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#5—Cobbey Crisler on Luke 7.19-22 (B12) Jesus’ measuring standard—works!

“Jesus responds in the next verses to John the Baptist’s question about whether Jesus really is the Messiah they were waiting for. There is only one answer Jesus has for John. Jesus doesn’t dictate the answer. He tells John the Baptists disciples to just go and look and conclude for themselves what they had seen and heard. Jesus had opened blind eyes, corrected lame limbs, cleansed lepers, enabled the deaf to hear perfectly, raised the dead, and preached the good news of victory to the poor. Then they were to take their observations back to John the Baptist.

That would be the only answer Jesus would give: his works. If that’s the only answer Jesus gave for the effectiveness of theology, I doubt that the rules have changed.

What would be the measure of effective theology to Jesus right here and now, if he looked around at every denomination on the face of the globe? Would they have to come up against that same merciless, yet really merciful, measurement? Are we producing? Are we solving problems?

In the twentieth (and twenty-first) century, problems seem to be multiplying faster than the loaves and fishes did. We have very little time. We can’t afford to waste time on anything that doesn’t work, especially religion.”
“Luke the Researcher”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


PS#6—Cobbey Crisler on Matt. 8:14-16 (B16):
"(Verse 14. We come to the third healing [in Matthew's series of 10 of Jesus' proofs after the Sermon on the Mount of his Messiahship by his works, the healing of] Peter's mother-in-law. To have a mother-in-law, Peter had to be married. Peter had a wife. It's on the Sabbath day, too. But does Jesus consider women that important? Would he break the Sabbath for a woman? One may think that he might for a man. But would he do it for a woman? He does. Whatever business he had in Peter's house, he puts all aside and gives priority to the mother-in-law's needs. Despite the fact that it was the Sabbath. (Verse 15). He heals her of fever. [W: So much, for the supposed length and severity of the flu these days--as well as for its being communicable... "and she arose and ministered unto them."].
(Verse 16). "Many come, when the even was come to be healed." Why the evening? Because then the Sabbath is over and they could all come without any fear of recriminations from the Jews.”
“Book of Matthew, Auditing the Master: A Tax Collector’s Report” , by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#7—KEN COOPER'S BONUS POEM (on citation B16) can be reached via this link to our online version of Warren's PS additions by clicking on the DOWNLOADABLE PDF FILE in the UPPER RIGHT-HAND CORNER. Ken sent the linked poem, "A Parent's Revelation" for "God” the Christian Science Bible Lesson Bible Lesson for the week ending July 15, 2018. Ken wrote about it, Jesus was just so full of God's love, and the receptive thought was always uplifted. To be aware that "There is no power apart from God" brings its own proof that there is also no existence apart from God. Listening to her son-in-law recounting all the miracles must have been like attending a Testimony Meeting! What a feeling that must have given of the power and love of God!"


W’s PS#8–Cobbey Crisler on John 5:17-20 (B17):
“In John 5:17, “Jesus said, You’re stopping me for healing on the Sabbath day. But my reading of the Scripture is this, My Father worketh hitherto and I work.” If the original works, what can the image or reflection do?

Notice also John 5:19 is Jesus’ famous statement, “The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do.” Taking this apart, it really gives you what man’s role is. What is it? It’s reflection. It’s image.
Man is not original in what he does. What he does stems from the original which is God. Then it reflects originality. Otherwise there would be competition for the job of Creator. Under monotheism there is no possibility for such competition (“For what things soever he doeth, these also doeth the Son likewise.”)
He took the Son of Man through every problem that the world could hurl at him and proved that even the Son of Man can be victorious and not a creature of circumstances when the understanding of his true nature as the Son of God can be applied.
Our understanding of the Son of Man and the Son of God, and the difference, might be heightened by realizing that the Christ comes to the Son of Man. The Christ doesn’t come to the Son of God because the Christ really presents the Son of God.
We’re on the human side of things, who feel the foot of domination on our necks from outside circumstances. Is that where the Son of Man belongs? Notice the argument of Bildad in the book of Job… It uses the very same phrase that Jesus does, elevating him way above the outlines of fleshly domination. So, “The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do.” Why?

John 5:20, “The Father loves the Son.”
John 5:30. The same point is repeated, “I can of mine own self do nothing.” Is this false humility or is Jesus actually giving us the facts straight out? What is the secret and source of everything he thought or did? What is the obstacle then between us and following Jesus? There’s something in there. Some kind of different concept of our selfhood than what he had. His was so transparent that there was nothing obstructing his at-one-ment with God, even on earth. His summons to us is to follow his example and shows his own expectation that we’re equipped to do it. So, we’re equipped to receive and to act on the instructions given us via communication. All we need to do is tune in.
We’re coming to understand Jesus’ view of himself, and where he thinks this authority originates, “The Son of Man can do nothing of himself. (John 5:19)

John, the Beloved Disciple”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#9—on John 14:12 (B18) Greater Works (from my 12-29-13 Met on Christian Science):
“Jesus said… Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do; because I go unto my Father…” (B-17, John 14:12) Christine Irby Williams nicely tackled the tough question of what works could possibly be greater than what Jesus did in a wonderful precamp inspirational talk to CedarS staff one May as well as in part of an inspirational address for the Christian Science Nurses conference at CedarS this September. She essentially said, in part: “Have you ever wondered what in the world Jesus meant by greater works? It does sound a little daunting. We read almost every week in the Bible Lesson something such as Jesus “went about…healing ALL manner of sickness and ALL manner of disease among the people.” He fed 5,000 men plus women and children with what had appeared to everyone else as a few loaves and fishes. He walked on water and suspended time and space. He raised to life a child who appeared to have just passed away, a young man who was on his way to be buried, and Lazarus, who had been in the grave four days already. And then, of course, he raised himself after the crucifixion, and he ascended. So what could possibly be greater than any, much less all, of that? I’ve often wondered, and I’m still pondering his promise… There has been one particular area in which it’s likely that we’ve all been aware that there is plenty of room for “greater works,” and that is working together, or what might be called collective demonstration: in families, church work, any kind of organizational work—in a church context or otherwise, in neighborhoods, in governments of all sizes, in nations, among the people, and in the world at large. Would you agree with me that these are areas that could benefit from the light of Truth, the touch of the Comforter—the healing and saving ministries of divine Love? Might we be so bold as to think about tackling the environment? World peace? World hunger? If not, why not? If so, let’s get on with it! Let us “then up and be doing,” as our hymn [#18] says!” You can read more inspiration on this and other topics from Chris that she shared at the 2012 Fern Lodge Annual Meeting at http://fernlodge.org/2012/11/jesus-promise-you-will-do-greater-works/


W’s PS#10—Cobbey Crisler on Acts 10.1-5, 25-35 (B20):
Now let’s turn to Acts, Chapter 10. Here we’re introduced to Cornelius. Cornelius sounds like he was a musician of some sort, at least the way the King James Version translates it. We are told that “Cornelius belonged to the Italian band, a devout man, and one apparently who had despite his heathen background, been impressed by monotheism and was used to praying.”
“He receives a vision.” (paraphrased…) “Peter himself, (is) going to pray on the house top,” (verse 9 of Acts, Chapter 10) “about the sixth hour (or our noon time).” (paraphrased)

Entering into Cornelius’s house, Peter finds he is surrounded by all Gentiles and a large group.

Peter is being faced now with a major challenge, because it is his training, as you can see in Acts 10, verse 28, that “it is unlawful for him to enter in and eat and keep company with Gentiles.” (paraphrased, see below)

Acts 10:28 And he said unto them, Ye know how that it is an unlawful thing for a man that is a Jew to keep company, or come unto one of another nation; but God hath shewed me that I should not call any man common or unclean

Then it is Peter’s vision comes clear. If God had told him in that vision that , “what God hath cleansed, that call not thou common.” (Acts 10:15)

And that applied to animals, what about men? Is it possible that Christianity is designed for anyone and everyone? If that’s what the Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost has revealed to Peter, let’s see what the result is.

Acts 10, verse 34, begins a lecture or sermon to the first group of Gentiles. And the opening statement that Peter makes is one that could be well considered by every denomination of Christianity today. “Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons.”

Here Peter expressed his new view of God, that God is no respecter of persons, that God speaks to receptivity. This new view of God, of course, leads to this next question: Should man as well be no respecter of persons? This is a tradition-shattering concept.

And Acts 10, verse 35, Peter summarizes it by saying “in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.”
After the Master What? – The Book of Acts by B. Cobbey Crisler**


**You can buy your own transcripts of most of Cobbey’s 28 talks at a new website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com

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